Self-Paced (F3) EMS Continuing Education Course

EMS

Simplify your recertification process and complete your continuing education with Medic-CE. Our programs are nationally accredited by CAPCE as F3, accepted by all 50 states and the National Registry.

The self-paced subscription package also includes access to our fire courses, so if interested in both, you only need to purchase one access level.

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1 Year
10 Self-Paced Courses

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1 Year
UNLIMITED
Self-Paced Courses

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2 Year
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Courses

Airway Management and Ventilation
Airway I - Basic Airway Anatomy and Assessment

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Next, the different forms of airway obstruction will be detailed. After that, essential elements of the assessment of a patient with airway compromise will be identified. The course will conclude with a presentation of a case study that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of basic airway anatomy and assessment can help you provide even more effective care to your patients.

Airway II - Basic Airway Management and Ventilation

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by reviewing airway anatomy and physiology. Next, basic maneuvers for securing and stabilizing the airway will be detailed. After that, techniques for establishing and maintaining adequate ventilation will be explained. This will be followed by a section which will describe the components of oxygen delivery systems. The course will conclude by identifying special considerations in airway management.

Airway III - Endotracheal Intubation

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2.5

The following course will begin with a brief review of airway anatomy and lung volumes. Next, the indications, contraindications, advantages, and disadvantages of endotracheal intubation will be identified. This will be followed by a section that will describe the equipment needed and patient preparation for endotracheal intubation. After that, the different techniques for performing endotracheal intubation will be explained. Then, potential complications of endotracheal intubation will be identified. The course will conclude with a review of current literature concerning prehospital endotracheal intubation.

Basic Capnography

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Explain the normal physiology of the respiratory system.
  • Correlate the capnogram with the respiratory cycle.
  • Describe normal capnography values.
  • Identify abnormal capnography waveforms.
  • Identify potential medical problems creating abnormal capnography waveforms.
Rapid Sequence Intubation

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Define RSI-specific terminology and describe the history of RSI.
  • Identify the physiology of Acetylcholine and describe medications used in RSI.
  • List indications and contraindications of RSI.
  • Describe the steps involved in performing RSI, including: airway assessment, pre-oxygenation, proper patient positioning, and preparing the necessary equipment.
  • Define a failed airway and describe the proper procedures for treating a patient with a failed airway.
  • Explain how to troubleshoot a decompensating post-intubation patient.
Medical
Allergy and Anaphylaxis

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will present allergy and anaphylaxis from pathophysiology to treatment. First, the immune system will be described with emphasis placed on how an immune system response can develop into an allergic or anaphylactic reaction. Next, the pathophysiology of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis will briefly be covered. This will be followed by a brief review of the pharmacotherapy available for allergy and anaphylaxis. The course will conclude with a presentation of several case studies that will help you synthesize the material that you learned.

Behavioral and Psychiatric Emergency

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying definitions related to behavioral and psychiatric conditions. After that, the basic epidemiology of behavioral and psychiatric disorders will be listed. Next, the psychopathology of mental health disorders will be presented. This will be followed by a description of the main types of behavioral and psychiatric conditions. After that, essential elements of the assessment and management of patients suffering from mental health emergencies will be identified. The course will conclude with a brief discussion of the medico-legal aspects of the care of mental health patients.

Cardiology I - A Review of Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. After that, basic principles of cardiac electrophysiology will be detailed. The course will conclude with a presentation of three cardiovascular case studies that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of cardiac anatomy and physiology can help you provide even more effective care to your patients.

Cardiology II - Cardiovascular Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin with a review of the general assessment and management of patients suffering from cardiovascular emergencies. This section will include a review of the 2015 AHA guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. The remainder of the course will present case studies of cardiovascular emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as pathophysiology and epidemiology), and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

Cardiology III - Chest Pain

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

One of the most common warning signs of a problem with the cardiovascular system is chest pain. In fact, greater than 10 million Americans are living with symptoms of cardiac-related chest pain. (1,1b) As a prehospital care provider, you will be at the forefront of identifying and managing persons with chest pain and can play an integral role in saving countless lives. The purpose of this course is to describe the pathophysiology of chest pain, to identify the essential elements of the assessment and management of chest pain, and to present several case studies to increase your knowledge of chest pain- related emergencies, so that you can provide an even higher level of care to your patients.

Cardiology IV - Dysrhythmias

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing essential principles of cardiac electrophysiology. After that, basic EKG analysis will be explained. Next, basic cardiac dysrhythmias will be identified. This will be followed by a section which will describe key elements of the assessment and management of a dysrhythmia patient. The course will conclude with a presentation of case studies that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of cardiac anatomy and physiology, EKGs, and basic dysrhythmias can help you provide more effective care to your patients.

Diabetic Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing the physiology of normal glucose metabolism. Next, the pathophysiology of diabetes will be identified. After that, essential elements of the assessment and management of diabetic patients will be listed. The course will conclude with a presentation of several case studies that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of diabetic emergencies can help you to provide even more effective care to your patients.

Endocrine Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system. Next, the pathophysiology of endocrine emergencies will be identified. After that, essential elements of the assessment and management of endocrine emergencies will be listed. The course will conclude with a presentation of several case studies that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of endocrine emergencies can help you to provide even more effective care to your patients.

Environmental Emergencies I - The Physiology and Pathophysiology of Temperature-Related Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying mechanisms of heat gain and heat loss within the body. Next, the process of thermoregulation will be explained (in other words, how the body maintains its normal temperature). After that, general pathophysiologic principles involving hot and cold emergencies will be covered. The course will conclude by identifying risk factors for the development of temperature-related emergencies.

Environmental Emergencies II - The Assessment and Management of Termperature-Related Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying essential elements of the assessment of patients suffering from temperature-related emergencies. After that, the management of these conditions will be detailed. The course will conclude with a detailed presentation of common cases of temperature-related emergencies.

Environmental Emergencies III - Drowning Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying basic definitions related to drowning. In addition, the basic epidemiology and causes of these incidents will be listed. Next, the pathophysiology leading to morbidity and mortality in drowning will be presented. After that, the essential elements of the assessment and management of drowning incidents will be described. The course will conclude with a detailed presentation of 3 cases of drowning-related emergencies.

Environmental Emergencies IV - Deep-Water Diving Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying basic principles of chemistry and physics related to deep-water diving emergencies. Next, general pathophysiologic principles involved in deep-water diving emergencies will be covered. This will be followed by a description of essential elements of the assessment and management of these patients. The course will conclude with a detailed presentation of 3 cases of deep-water diving emergencies followed by a brief description of several other gas-related deep-water illnesses.

Environmental Emergencies V - High-Altitude Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying basic principles of chemistry and physics relevant to altitude illnesses. Next, general principles involved in high-altitude physiology will be covered. This will be followed by identifying key pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in high-altitude illness. After that, the essential elements of the assessment and management of these patients will be listed. The course will conclude with a presentation of three cases of high-altitude emergencies.

Gastrointestinal Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2.5

The following course will begin by describing the basic anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Next, the pathophysiology of pain within the GI system will be discussed. After that, the general assessment and management of patients with gastrointestinal emergencies will be identified. The course will conclude with a presentation of common cases of gastrointestinal emergencies.

Gynecological Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive tract. Next, the basic assessment and management of patients with gynecological emergencies will be listed. Last, the course will conclude with a presentation of the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of common gynecological emergencies.

Hematology

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing the composition and physiology of the hematologic system. Next, basic hematologic lab values will be identified. This will be followed by a discussion of blood products, blood typing, and blood transfusions. After that, the general assessment and management of patients with hematologic disorders will be explained. The course will conclude by presenting details of common hematologic conditions.

Infectious Diseases I - Overview of Microbiology and Immunology

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course is the first in a series of four courses covering infectious diseases and will present an overview of the organisms that cause disease, as well as the mechanisms our body uses to fight them off.

Infectious Diseases II - Infection Control

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course is the second in a series of four lectures covering infectious diseases and presents an overview of how to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases. The course will begin by describing the risk of, and basic steps involved in, contracting an infectious disease while on the job. Next, organizations that participate in infection control will be identified. After that, essential features of on-the-job infection control will be detailed. In addition, the basic components of the response to an on-the-job infectious exposure will be listed. The course will conclude by detailing key elements of disease prevention.
Infectious Diseases III - The Big Five and Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course is the third in a series of four lectures covering infectious diseases and is one of two courses in the series that focuses specifically on individual infectious diseases. The first section of this course will cover the Big 5 infectious diseases in healthcare, including: HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and meningococcal meningitis. The second half of this course will cover important pediatric infectious diseases.

Infectious Diseases IV - Other Important Infectious Diseases

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course is the final course in a series of four lectures covering infectious diseases and is one of two lectures in the series that will focus specifically on individual infectious diseases. The first section will focus on common sexually transmitted diseases including: syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes. The second half of this course will cover other important infectious diseases not discussed in the other courses within this series.

Neonatal Defects

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course with identify causes of neonatal birth defects. It will explain the presentation, methods for assessment, and emergent treatment at birth for:

  • Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome)
  • Cleft lip and cleft palate
  • Atrioventricular septal defect
  • Intestinal atresia/stenosis
  • Gastrochisis
Neonatal Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

As a Paramedic, providing care to a neonatal patient is stressful and challenging. This course will provide an overview on:

  • Discuss the prevalence of neonatal resuscitation
  • Identify the assessment steps for a newborn
  • Discuss the delivery of a newborn
  • Explain the Neonatal Resuscitation algorithm for resuscitating the newborn
  • Select the right equipment for resuscitation of the newborn
Neurological Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the anatomy and physiology of the neurological system of the human body.
  • Describe a systematic approach to assessing a patient with a neurological emergency.
  • List and define commonly found neurological problems that patient’s present with.
  • Use physical exam findings and assessments to form a field diagnosis for the patient.
Neurology I - Nervous System Anatomy and Phsyiology

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying the basic cells of the nervous system. This will be followed by a discussion of the physiology of signaling within the nervous system. After that, the anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system will be presented. The course will conclude by describing the peripheral nervous system.

Neurology II - Cerebrovascular Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2.5

The following course will begin by identifying the basic epidemiology of cerebrovascular disorders. After that, the vascular supply to the brain will be described. In addition, the major functions of the different areas of the brain will be reviewed. This will be followed by a discussion of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease. Next, the assessment and management of patients suffering from cerebrovascular emergencies will be explained. The course will conclude by presenting three cases of cerebrovascular emergencies and one case of a medical condition that can produce signs and symptoms similar to a stroke.

Prehospital Care for the Obstetric Patient

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system, as well as the changes that occur during pregnancy. After that, the stages of fetal development will be presented. Next, the general assessment and management of obstetric patients will be described, and the complications related to pregnancy will be identified. The section after that will describe the stages of normal labor and delivery, as well as the assessment and management of the patient in labor. The course will conclude by identifying the assessment and management of intrapartum and postpartum complications.

Respiratory Emergencies I - General Principles of Respiratory Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by describing the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Next, the pathophysiology of respiratory emergencies will be explained. After that, essential elements of the assessment and management of patients with respiratory emergencies will be identified. The course will conclude with a presentation of a case study that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of respiratory emergencies can help you provide even more effective care to your patients.

Respiratory Emergencies II - Case Studies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2.5

The following course will present case studies of respiratory emergencies by highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as pathophysiology and epidemiology), and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

Shock and Resuscitation

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying the different types of shock, as well as by describing their associated pathophysiology. After that, the essential elements of the assessment of patients suffering from shock will be discussed. Next, general guidelines for the management of shock, including AHA recommendations, will be described. The following section will identify adjuncts used to assist with patient resuscitation. The course will conclude by presenting case studies of shock emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as basic pathophysiology involved), and describing an initial assessment and management strategy.

Toxicology I - Basic Principles of Toxicologic Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying important terms related to toxicologic emergencies and will also list the epidemiology and basic causes of these incidents. Next, fundamental principles of pharmacology will be detailed to enhance your understanding of how poisons interact with the body. In addition, basic toxidromes will be identified. After that, key principles of the pathophysiology of toxic exposures will be described. Then, essential elements of the assessment of patients suffering from a toxicologic emergency will be detailed. Following the presentation on patient assessment will be a description of the management of toxicologic emergencies. The course will conclude with a discussion of basic principles of poisoning prevention.

Toxicology II - Common Toxicologic Emergencies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by reviewing key elements of the general assessment and management of toxicologic emergencies. The remainder of the course will focus on individual toxicologic emergencies, describing each substance, discussing key aspects of each emergency (such as epidemiology and pathophysiology), highlighting key signs and symptoms, and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

Toxicology III - Substance Abuse

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying basic definitions related to substance abuse. In addition, the basic epidemiology of substance abuse will be listed. Next, the toxidromes of commonly abused drugs will be presented. After that, essential elements of the assessment and management of patients suffering from an emergency related to substance abuse will be presented. The course will conclude with a detailed presentation of commonly abused drugs.

Operations
Crime Scenes and Violent Incidents

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The following course will present information to reinforce your knowledge of responding to violent incidents and crime scenes. First, the course will describe how EMS crews should approach different crime scenes or violent incidents. Next, the safety tactics that can be used in dangerous situations will be explained. The section after that will describe special equipment and teams used in tactical operations. The course will conclude by describing the types of evidence found at a crime scene and by presenting the proper procedures for evidence preservation and documentation.

Emergency Medical Service Operations

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

In this course, the overview of Emergency Medical Service Operations will be reviewed. The course explains several different types of ems delivery models, emergency vehicle operations overview and the well- being of the EMS provider.

  • Identify the operational function and flow of EMS Company Operations.
  • Describe the phases of ambulance response.
  • Identify vehicle designs and driver operator expectations.
  • Review flight operations and safety.
  • Discuss different forms of specialized EMS calls and equipment.
  • Discuss Responder Mental Health
Multiple Casualty Incidents

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The following course will begin by identifying the different types of and describing the initial approach to multiple casualty incidents. Next, key principles of the National Incident Management System and structural components of an Incident Command System will be described. The course will conclude by identifying how to triage patients based on the START method.

National Incident Management System and MCI

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1) Describe the role of the communications center for EMS services 2) Explain Incident Command Systems (ICS) concepts 3) Discuss the roles of the ICS officers 4) Discuss the roles of the Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) officers

Rescue Awareness and Operations

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The following course will cover general rescue awareness and operations. The course will begin by identifying the importance of safety procedures and describing the types of personal protective equipment needed to safely operate in the rescue environment. Next, the phases of a rescue operation will be described. After that, the techniques, risks, and complications of rescues involving surface water will be explained. The course will conclude with a presentation of basic principles of rescue awareness for hazardous atmosphere, highway, and hazardous terrain operations.

Patient Assessment
Emergency Medical Information Service

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

This course reflects continuing efforts to provide information that will improve the understanding and use of medical identification and EMIS. Awareness, recognition, and proactive use of medical identification systems by emergency response personnel can make a difference in patient care if used in support of the patient assessment and treatment. Remember, knowledge is power.

Patient Assessment I

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by describing how to analyze dispatch information. Next, the process of performing a scene size-up will be identified. After that, the steps involved in assessing a patient’s mental status will be listed. This will be followed by a discussion of how to form an initial impression. Next, the SAMPLE history will be described. After that, a description of the vital signs will be provided. Then, the process formulating a general impression will be detailed. The course will conclude with a presentation of two case studies that will demonstrate how increasing your knowledge of initial patient assessment can help you to provide even more effective care to your patients.

Patient Assessment II - Key Aspects of Patient History

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The following course will begin by describing key guidelines for establishing a good rapport with your patient. Next, important issues to consider when questioning a patient will be identified. The course will conclude by identifying ways to obtain a structured patient history. Pediatric cases are only 10 percent of our call volume, and they inherently scare us. Because EMS providers do not care for pediatric patients regularly, these cases may push us out of our comfort zone when it is time to care for and comfort these patients. With exposure, experience, and most important, frequent and correct training, EMS providers can become confident and competent in treating pediatric patients. The most important aspects of treating a pediatric patient are assessment and optimizing ventilation and oxygenation. This course will cover the many aspects of assessment, including common pediatric emergencies, assessment techniques, and will provide an overview of congenital heart defects in children.

Rapid Trauma Assessment

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The rapid trauma assessment is a systematic, structured approach to trauma assessment that allows you to gather information in a head-to- toe manner as quickly and accurately as possible and, when properly and carefully utilized, will minimize omissions and mistakes so that you can formulate a clear picture of your patient’s condition. The following course will begin by identifying the steps involved in the rapid trauma assessment and by describing key findings for each step. Next, the course will present reasons to interrupt the rapid trauma assessment and initiate transport. The course will conclude by describing the steps involved in the secondary assessment following a rapid trauma assessment.

Pediatrics
Abuse I - Pediatric Maltreatment

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by defining various terms pertaining to pediatric abuse and neglect. The epidemiology of pediatric maltreatment will then be identified. After that, risk factors for victims and perpetrators of child abuse will be discussed. Next, the consequences of pediatric abuse and neglect will be listed. This will be followed by a presentation of essential elements of the assessment and management of pediatric abuse and neglect. The course will conclude with a discussion of the medical-legal aspects pediatric maltreatment.

Congenital Cardiovascular Disorders

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by explaining the general concept of nutrient transport in an organism and describing why a cardiovascular system is necessary in more complex forms of life. This will be followed by identifying the general processes involved in heart formation. After that, a detailed example of a defect that could arise as a result of an error in one of the formative processes will be discussed. Several cases will then be presented which encompass some of the most common congenital cardiac anomalies. Each case will provide a brief clinical vignette, followed by an explanation of the relevant historical and physical exam elements. In addition, each case will provide a description of the particular anomaly, present a general management plan, discuss the potential complications of each anomaly, as well as provide a brief explanation of options for the medical and surgical treatment of these patients.

Pediatric Airway Management

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Acute evaluation and management of the pediatric airway is not a regularly used set of skills, and can be very stressful when encountered in the field; but having a baseline understanding of anatomy and technique will help you to be successful.

Pediatric Assessment

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Pediatric cases are only 10 percent of our call volume, and they inherently scare us. Because EMS providers do not care for pediatric patients regularly, these cases may push us out of our comfort zone when it is time to care for and comfort these patients. With exposure, experience, and most important, frequent and correct training, EMS providers can become confident and competent in treating pediatric patients. The most important aspects of treating a pediatric patient are assessment and optimizing ventilation and oxygenation. This course will cover the many aspects of assessment, including common pediatric emergencies, assessment techniques, and will provide an overview of congenital heart defects in children.

Pediatric Trauma

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the developmental stages of pediatric patients.
  • Identify anatomical and physiological considerations for pediatric patients.
  • Explain assessment techniques for pediatric trauma patients.
  • Identify signs and symptoms related to specific injuries in pediatric patients.
  • Describe appropriate management techniques for pediatric trauma patients.
Pediatrics I - Introduction to Pediatric Emergency Care

Credit Hours (CEUs): 3

The following course will begin by identifying basic definitions and epidemiology pertaining to pediatric emergencies. After that, differences in the anatomy and physiology of infants, children, and adults will be described. Next, developmental milestones and their implications for prehospital care will be presented. The course will conclude by listing essential elements of the assessment and management of pediatric patients.

Preparatory
Autonomic Nervous System and Associated Pharmacology

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the anatomy and divisions of the nervous system.
  • Explain the physiology of neurotransmitters, synapses, and receptors.
  • Describe the different classes of drugs that affect the autonomic nervous system.
Current Issues in Wellness

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by defining wellness, describing why it is often neglected, and identifying how to work towards achieving it. After that, each of the specific components of wellness will be described. First, physical well-being will be discussed. This section will cover several elements of physical well-being, including weight maintenance, proper nutrition, physical fitness, disease prevention, and job safety. Next, emotional and mental well-being will be covered. These sections will include an explanation of the causes, phases, and general management of stress, a description of the stages of grieving, as well as general recommendations for dealing with the family of a dead or dying patient.

EMS Communications

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

The following course will present basic elements of interpersonal communication and key aspects of communications systems utilized in EMS. The course will begin by describing the basic elements of interpersonal communication necessary to convey information. Next, the course will present the different methods of communication used in the EMS. The course will conclude by describing the role of dispatch in EMS communications, as well as by identifying procedures for communicating with the various members of an EMS system.

EMS Future Initiatives

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.75

Within this course, the student will learn about the concepts associated with evidence-based medicine and practice including the expanding scope of practice for EMS providers. Also discussed will be the concept of alternative transport locations for EMS providers and how training for EMS integrates new technologies and skills. To close the student will examine emerging trends in EMS.

Ethics in EMS

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1) Explain the meaning of Ethics. 2) Identify where medical ethics originated and how it progressed. 3) Describe instances where the USA violated ethical standards. 4) Explain basic principles of the Nuremburg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki.

Pharmacology - Adsorptions, Administration and Calculations

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the factors that affect absorption rates.
  • Identify the different routes of medication administration.
  • Determine the concentration of a drug in solution and calculate the appropriate volume required to deliver the correct dose of a medication.
  • Calculate the appropriate infusion rate of medication and fluid infusions.
The Emergency Medical Services - Past, Present & Future

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.25

The following course will begin by reviewing the history of the Emergency Medical Services. After that, the current state of the EMS and the roles of the personnel within the system will be discussed. The course will conclude by elaborating on provisions to improve the delivery of emergency care, as set forth in three key EMS documents published over the last 20 years.

The EMS and Public Health

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The purpose of this course is to describe how you and your EMS agency can participate in public health promotion and injury prevention. The course will begin by presenting basic epidemiology concerning injury and illness. After that general principles of effective public health promotion will be explained. Next, your function as a role model for wellness and job safety will be described. The course will conclude by identifying your current and expanding roles in injury prevention and other community health interventions, as well as explaining the role of an EMS organization in health promotion.

Special Considerations
Abuse II - Elder Maltreatment

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by defining various terms pertaining to elder maltreatment. The epidemiology of elder abuse and neglect will then be identified. After that, risk factors for victims and perpetrators of elder maltreatment will be discussed. Next, essential principles of the assessment and management of elder maltreatment will be presented. The course will conclude with a discussion of the medical-legal aspects of elder maltreatment.

Abuse III - Intimate Partner Violence

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by defining terms pertaining to intimate partner violence. Next, the epidemiology of intimate partner violence as well as key risk factors for victims and perpetrators will be listed. This will be followed by a description of the consequences of IPV. The course will conclude by presenting key elements of the assessment and management of victims of intimate partner violence

Caring for Patients with Special Challenges

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying basic guidelines for dealing with patients with special challenges. The next several sections of the course will explain the causes, identification, and management of patients with special challenges.

Geriatrics I - Introduction to Geriatric Emergency Care

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin by identifying the changes associated with aging that occur in the various organ systems of the body. After that, the effects of polypharmacy, pharmacokinetics, and noncompliance with medications in the geriatric population will be explained. Next, the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of common geriatric diseases and disorders will be presented. The course will conclude by describing the assessment and management of geriatric trauma patients, geriatric patients with temperature-related emergencies, as well as geriatric patients suffering from toxicological emergencies.

Trauma
Abdominal Trauma Part I - General Principles of Abdominal Trauma

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin with a review of pertinent abdominal anatomy. Next, mechanisms of injury involved in abdominal trauma will be discussed. This will be followed by a presentation of the pathophysiology of abdominal trauma and a description of the types of abdominal pain. The course will conclude by detailing the general assessment and management of patients suffering from abdominal trauma.

Abdominal Trauma Part II - Case Studies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will present case studies of abdominal trauma emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as the pathophysiology and epidemiology), suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy, and listing some complications of each particular traumatic abdominal injury.

Blood Substitutes

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following continuing education course is intended to inform the emergency medical care provider about the current state and future of blood substitute development. The course will begin by highlighting the need for an effective blood substitute. After that, a review of the structure and function of an erythrocyte will be presented. This review will be followed by a description of some basic hematologic lab values. Next, the pathophysiology of blood loss will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of transfusions and blood typing. After that, the evolution of blood substitute development will be detailed. The final section will elaborate on ethical issues concerning the clinical testing of blood substitutes.

Burn Emergencies I - General Principles of Burn Injuries

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin with a review of the anatomy and physiology of the skin. Next, the classification of burns will be discussed. This will be followed by a presentation of the pathophysiology of burns and their associated complications. After that, a general assessment and management plan for burn patients will be described. The course will conclude with a presentation on burn prevention efforts.

Burn Emergencies II - Burn Case Studies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 2

The following course will begin with a review of the assessment and management of patients suffering from burns. The remainder of the course will present case studies of burn emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as pathophysiology and epidemiology), and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

Head Trauma and Brain Injuries

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1) Identify the anatomy of the cranial vault. 2) Explain the pathophysiology of brain injuries. 3) Describe the effects of increasing intracranial pressure (ICP, for short). 4) Explain the general assessment and management of patients with brain injuries.

Overview of Musculoskeletal Trauman

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

Musculoskeletal injuries are commonly encountered by EMS providers. This course defines musculoskeletal injuries including the review of the anatomy and physiology of bones and joints as well as injury patterns. This course will also review the assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries.

Soft Tissue Trauma I - General Principles of Soft Tissue Trauma

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin by identifying the anatomy and physiology of the skin. This will be followed by a description of the process of wound healing. After that, the different types of soft tissue injuries will be identified. Next, essential elements of the assessment and management of patients with soft tissue trauma will be listed. This will be followed by a discussion on special management considerations in soft tissue trauma. The course will conclude with a discussion of the complications of soft tissue trauma.

Soft Tissue Trauma II - Case Studies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will present case studies of soft tissue trauma emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as the pathophysiology and basic epidemiology), and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

Spinal Trauma

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the spinal cord and the spinal column.
  • Identify the mechanisms of injury involved in spinal trauma and the pathophysiology of spinal trauma.
  • Explain the assessment and management of spinal trauma, including a discussion on the use of backboards.
Thoracic Trauma I - General Principles of Thoracic Trauma

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will begin with a review of pertinent thoracic anatomy. Next, mechanisms of injury involved in thoracic trauma will be discussed. This will be followed by a presentation of the different types of thoracic traumatic injuries. The course will conclude by describing essential principles of the assessment and management of patients suffering from thoracic trauma.

Thoracic Trauma II - Case Studies

Credit Hours (CEUs): 1.5

The following course will present case studies of thoracic trauma emergencies, highlighting key elements of the history and physical exam, discussing key aspects of each case (such as pathophysiology and epidemiology), and suggesting an initial assessment and management strategy.

ACCREDITATION

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